mexi-doodler:

Kiki’s Delivery Service Trailer

OOOHHHH MY GAAAAWWWDDD!!! 

(via duckindolans)


chimerahellden:

kelzthalassunwhisper:

girlwiththerobottattoo:

I JUST UGLY LAUGHED SO HARD I WOKE UP THE DAMN HOUSE JFC!!!

LOL

HOLY FUCKK DO NOT CLICK THIS IF YOU NEED TO BE QUIET

OH GOSH

(via duckindolans)


paris666hilton:

THIS IS ART

(via duckindolans)




writeifyoudare:

The Hero’s Journey, or Monomyth, is mythologist Joseph Campbell’s theory that most stories throughout the world follow a simple narrative pattern. 

This pattern can be expressed in many different ways. Sometimes it’s a circle, or a straight line, or another shape entirely. It can contain as many of 17 steps and as few as 3. At its most basic, the theory states that:

  1. The Protagonist is called to adventure.
  2. The Protagonist must undergo trials or great hardship
  3. The Protagonist masters the conflict and returns home.

It makes sense, right? You can probably think of a lot of books and movies that follow the pattern. Harry Potter, The Hobbit, Star Wars, The Odyssey, Ender’s Game, Beowulf, American Gods, Alice in Wonderland. To name just a few.

But there are a lot of problems with the Hero’s Journey. 

  1. It leaves out A LOT of stories. Ulysses, SandmanTwilight, Beauty and the Beast, Star Trek, Dune, Watchmen, The Adventures of Huck Finn, and Memento, to say nothing of every single romcom and story told outside of North America and Europe. These stories might be qualitatively good, or they might not be, but their lack of adherence to the Monomyth structure doesn’t have anything to do with their critical or commercial success.
  2. Following the structure doesn’t guarantee good stories. The Dark Tower Series, Last Action Hero, Van Helsing (movie), 50 Shades of Grey, Battlefield Earth, Temptation, Spawn, Mars Needs Moms are all arguably weak from a critical perspective. Yet they follow the Hero’s Journey just as well as many stronger stories that proponents of Monomyth want to claim.
  3. See stories attributed to Monomyth that you don’t agree fit the mold? No kidding! That’s another problem with the theory. Campbell himself notoriously shoehorned famous stories and myths into his narrow frame, attributing great importance to pieces that fit well, and quietly de-emphasizing aspects of stories that didn’t fit his theory. Which means that anyone can attempt to argue Anastasia from 50 Shades of Grey receiving her first spank represents a “Call to Action”. 
  4. Traditionally, the Hero’s Journey has been sexist and Eurocentric. It claims to represent stories from all over the world, but it doesn’t do a very good job of representing stories, myths or heroes from Asian, African, or Indigenous cultures. Stories that adhere to Monomyth stress individualist ego and exceptionalism over stories of social cooperation, and ignore stories and myths that don’t feature one individual hero. Furthermore, stories that rigidly adhere to Monomyth exclude female Protagonists. Check out TEMPTATION, MEETING THE GODDESS, and RESCUE THE PRINCESS, which all appear at different parts of different versions of the Hero’s Journey. According to Campbell, TEMPTATION requires “the seeker of the life beyond life must press beyond (the woman), surpass the temptations of her call, and soar to the immaculate ether beyond.” When the Hero MEETS THE GODDESS, it represents him meeting the purest form of femininity and creation. Campbell vainly asserts there is a female equivalent, but is unable to cite any examples. Can you? Who tempts the Heroine? Who does she meet who represents goodness and creation? Does she save the hero? Campbell allows for the possibility, but Monomyth’s default setting is male hero, female plot device. 
  5. It’s cliche as hell. When it’s done well, it’s a crowd pleaser, sure. But structurally it’s been done almost literally to death. And that’s okay, because it’s so limiting in the kinds of stories it can tell, that in order to be original, you have to break free.

Bottom Line: 
There is nothing wrong with following a traditional story structure in your writing. Just don’t be a slave to Campbell’s outdated, Eurocentric Monomyth theory of mythology. Don’t confuse a tool of literary criticism with some holy grail of plot structure. It won’t get you published or even considered if your story isn’t otherwise compelling. It’s just ONE kind of narrative arc that exists. Dare to be different. Dare to write.

(via elegantmess100)



dwarvenqueen:

-

 

featherymischief:

angelshizuka:

Brother Bear Appreciation Week

Day 3: Favourite Quotes

LET ME TELL YOU WHY THIS IS ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT, UNDERRATED DISNEY FILMS OF ALL TIME OKAY:

1. It teaches kids that we should never judge others by their appearance or what we’ve seen on the surface.

2. It teaches kids that despite if we’ve been taught to be afraid of or hate something or someone that looks/acts differently than us, we should learn and try to understand them before we judge them.

3. It teaches that two sides that may hate each other don’t always have to stay that way - they can learn and grown from each other’s mistakes.

4. It teaches that hatred is not always the answer; to listen, to step back, and see through someone else’s eyes. It teaches patience, understanding, and wisdom.

5. IT TEACHES CHILDREN THAT PEOPLE CAN BE FORGIVEN AND DO BETTER.

6. It teaches children that even if you make a mistake, you can learn and grow from it like Kenai.

Seriously I just love this movie to pieces it is so important to me and I wish more people knew/watched it because wtf it’s AMAZING.

NOT TO MENTION THE ENTIRE CAST IS POC AND CULTURE WISE IT IS RESPECTFUL AND IT IS JUST A GREAT MOVIE OKAY

Yes it’s a great movie but KENAI IS A WORD THAT DESCRIBES THE FLAT AREA OF KENAI, SITKA MEANS “PEOPLE THAT LIVE NEAR THIS PARTICULAR ISLAND,” AND DENAHI IS A SHITTY TAKE ON THE NAME DENALI, AND THAT’S A FUCKING MOUNTAIN, THESE ARE NOT NAMES FOR PEOPLE

(via elegantmess100)


theilluminatormobilizer:

The Illuminator projected this near the Brooklyn Bridge in solidarity with the people of Ferguson.

(via punkscully)